Queensland Law Society

Practising Law in Queensland

Forms directory

Becoming a solicitor in Queensland

Academic and practical legal training requirements. Applying for admission to the Supreme Court of Queensland.

Practising certificates

To practise as a solicitor in Queensland a person must hold a practising certificate issued by the Society or by the designated regulatory authority in another Australian jurisdiction.

A practising certificate issued by the Society entitles the holder to engage in legal practice in Queensland, subject to compliance with the Legal Profession Act 2007, the Legal Profession Regulation 2007, the Queensland Law Society Administration Rule 2005 and:

  • statutory conditions;
  • any discretionary conditions;
  • contributions to the Legal Practitioners Fidelity Guarantee Fund (where required); and
  • Professional Indemnity Insurance coverage (where required).
To apply for a practising certificate:
Practising certificates can be renewed during May each year.

For enquiries call Records and Member Services on 1300 367 757 or email records@qls.com.au

Practising federal law in Queensland

To practise in a Federal Court, or a Court exercising federal jurisdiction in Queensland, a practitioner must to be:

  • admitted to the profession in an Australian jurisdiction; and
  • on the Register of Practitioners kept in the High Court in accordance with the provisions of section 55 of the Judiciary Act 1903 (Cth).

For further information, see the High Court website.

Practising foreign law in Queensland

Registration for foreign lawyers practising only foreign law in Queensland.
For enquiries call Records and Member Services on 1300 367 757 or email records@qls.com.au

Other certificates

For enquiries call Records and Member Services on 1300 367 757 or email records@qls.com.au

Locating Australian Legal Practitioners

Find a Queensland solicitor, a locum, a solicitor by practice area or a solicitor whose practising certificate has been issued in another jurisdiction.

For enquiries, call Records and Member Services on 1300 367 757 or email records@qls.com.au

Supervised legal practice

Every legal practitioner must complete the required period of supervised legal practice, unless exempted in whole or in part.  

Section 56 of the Legal Profession Act 2007 (the Act) imposes a condition on a practising certificate requiring the holder to engage in supervised legal practice until he or she has completed a period of supervised legal practice between 18 and 24 months.  If a solicitor completed:

  • supervised legal training as the basis for admission (eg articles of clerkship) then he or she must complete 18 months of supervised legal practice; or
  • practical legal training as the basis for admission (eg a graduate diploma) then he or she must complete 24 months of supervised legal practice.

Once the required period of supervised legal practice has been served, the practitioner can apply to the Society under s.56(1) of the Act by statutory declaration for the condition to be removed.  That statutory declaration must show how the applicant has complied with s.56(1) of the Act.  A sample statutory declaration is set out below.

If the practitioner believes there are grounds for a reduction to or exemption from the required period of supervised legal practice, he or she may make an application under s.56(3) of the Act.  Such application should be made by statutory declaration annexing all supporting documentation and addressing the matters required under s.56(3) of the Act.  These matters include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • the dates the applicant engaged in legal practice;
  • the length and nature of legal practice engaged in;
  • whether the applicant held a practising certificate, local admission or registration while engaging in legal practice;
  • whether there was any supervision while the applicant was engaged in legal practice;
  • the name and qualification of the supervisor and details of the type of practising certificate the supervisor held;
  • the length and nature of legal practice engaged in by the supervisor;
  • the jurisdiction in which the applicant engaged in legal practice, and details of its similarity to engaging in legal practice in Queensland;
  • full details of hours (if applicant did not engage in legal practice on a full time basis) or details of broken periods, if relevant;
  • other relevant matters.

Guidance on making applications under ss.56(1) and 56(3) of the Act is provided below:

Applications should be sent to records@qls.com.au

Continuing Professional Development (CPD)

Legal practitioners must complete at least ten CPD units each CPD year (which runs from 1 April to 31 March).  

The CPD Rules are contained in Part 6 of the Queensland Law Society Administration Rule 2005.  The CPD Committee has published a CPD Guide which provides guidelines on CPD compliance for Queensland legal practitioners.

Each year, QLS audits a random selection of practitioners for compliance with the CPD Rules.

For enquiries call Record and Member Services on 1300 367 757 or email cpd@qls.com.au

Practice Management Course

A legal practitioner who holds a current Practice Management Course (PMC) Statement or is granted a waiver or deferment by QLS, is eligible to hold a principal practising certificate.  A practitioner who holds a principal practising certificate is entitled to engage in legal practice as a partner of a law firm or multi-disciplinary practice, a sole practitioner or a legal practitioner director, subject to any restrictions, limitations or conditions on his or her practising certificate.
For enquiries call the PMC course co-ordinator on 07 3842 5961  or email pmc@qls.com.au

Practices Structures

The Legal Profession Act 2007 (the Act) defines "law practice" as a law firm, an incorporated legal practice, a multi-disciplinary practice or an Australian legal practitioner who is a sole practitioner.  "Law firm" is defined as comprising only Australian legal practitioners, or one or more Australian legal practitioners and one or more Australian-registered foreign lawyers.  The meaning of the terms "incorporated legal practice" and "multi-disciplinary practice" are set out in s.111 and s.144 of the Act.

It is the Society's view that engaging in legal practice in a structure outside the definitions contained in the Act is not permissible and may involve a breach of s.24 of the Act (prohibition on engaging in legal practice when not entitled).  A breach of s.24 has a number of consequences, including an inability to recover fees for anything done in contravention of the section and a liability to repay any fees already received.

Uniform Law

The Legal Profession Uniform Law (LPUL) scheme commenced in operation in Victoria and New South Wales on 1 July 2015, creating a uniform system of legal profession regulation for Victoria and New South Wales.

Costs guide

The QLS costs guide is a practical, voluntary guide to assist members complying with their legal obligations under the costs regime in Part 3.4 of the Legal Profession Act 2007